Norms and standards

Norms and standards

Reliable and durable

Tested marking methods from Phoenix Contact.

Aging test

Aging test: time and temperature curve  

Aging test: time and temperature curve

according to IEC 60947-7-1/-2

Terminal blocks are characterized, among other things, by long life cycles and their ability to safely withstand continuous temperatures of +125°C. In order to ensure that the marking or printing of these terminal blocks also meets these requirements, Phoenix Contact uses marking materials with heat stabilizers.

To simulate usage over several years, the marking materials, together with the terminal blocks or conductors, are subjected to a defined temperature cycle in the climate cabinet. The minimum temperature in the climate cabinet is set to +20°C and the maximum temperature to +120°C (+80°C for PVC).

The test objects reach the maximum permissible operating temperature during the warming phase and the ten-minute pause phase. The cooling down phase follows. The test consists of a total of 192 cycles.

Without exception, Phoenix Contact marking materials are tested according to IEC 60947‑7‑1/-2. All plastics used also have sufficient safety reserves.

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Resistance to oil and chemicals

according to DIN EN ISO 175

Physical or chemical processes or reactions can occur as a result of external media, such as liquids or gases. This can result in a change to the plastic's properties. The plastic can be damaged or even destroyed.

Imprints and labels can also be affected by these changes. In order to prevent this from happening, Phoenix Contact uses only plastics and printing/labeling materials which have been tested based on DIN EN ISO 175.

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UV light resistance

UV light resistance of plastics  

UV light resistance of plastics

according to DIN EN ISO 4892-2 and DIN EN ISO 60068-2-5

UV-B components restrict mechanical properties in plastics. As a consequence, imprints and labels can be damaged to a greater or lesser extent dependent upon the type of plastic.

Marking materials from Phoenix Contact can be stored in dry as well as humid atmospheres under UV radiation and are tested in accordance with the aforementioned standards.

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Corrosion test

Corrosion test according to DIN 50018  

Corrosion test

according to DIN 50018

Extreme ambient influences impose demanding requirements on components and their labeling and marking. The following test method, based on DIN 50018, describes the corrosion test in a condensation changing climate with an atmosphere that contains sulfur dioxide.

Two liters of distilled water and one liter of SO2 gas are introduced into a climate cabinet. During the test and at a test temperature of +40°C, an acidic atmosphere is formed, which affects the material surfaces of the test objects. After a testing time of eight hours, the test objects are left to dry for 16 hours with the door open.

Finally, a microscopic visual check is performed. All marking materials used by Phoenix Contact conform to this demanding standard and are resistant to aggressive substances.

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Salt spray

Salt spray according to IEC°60068‑2‑11/-52  

Salt spray

according to IEC 60068-2-11/-52

In the shipbuilding industry in particular, technical components must be marked in a way that is legible at all times in corrosive atmospheres. The salt content of the air in combination with the increased humidity places high demands on the imprints and materials used.

The impact of the climate at sea can be simulated on the basis of IEC 60068-2-11/-52. The resistance of the materials is tested with salt spray in a corrosive atmosphere. The test objects are placed in the test chamber and subjected to a finely dosed spray of five-percent sodium chloride solution (NaCl; pH value 6.5 - 7.2) at a temperature of +35°C for a period of 96 hours.

A microscopic inspection is performed after the test. Phoenix Contact marking materials fulfill these stringent requirements and can be used even in extreme climatic conditions.

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Solvent resistance

according to EN 60464‑2:2001

Markings and labels must be resistant to a variety of solvent vapors. According to the aforementioned standard, imprints and markings are stored in an acetone, n-hexane, and ethanol atmosphere for ten days, after which they must continue to be legible.

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Abrasion and wipe resistance

Abrasion and wipe resistance according to DIN EN 61010-1/DIN EN 61439-1  

Abrasion and wipe resistance

according to DIN EN 61010-1/DIN EN 61439-1

Markings and imprints must be resistant to standard industrial cleaning agents. The aforementioned standard prescribes the use of a soft cloth with water, isopropanol, petroleum ether, and n-hexane to clean markings and imprints. They must remain clearly legible after cleaning.

Phoenix Contact marking materials fulfill the stringent requirements as regards abrasion and wipe resistance and can be used in all applications.

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Scratch resistance

Scratch resistance according to DIN EN ISO 1518  

Scratch resistance

according to DIN EN ISO 1518

Markings and imprints must also be resistant to point or linear mechanical loads. For this reason, Phoenix Contact checks all markings and printouts for scratch resistance, in line with the abovementioned standard.

To do so, a scratching tool with a hemispherical tip (1 mm diameter) is applied to the test object with 2 to 6 N respectively, depending on the printing procedure. This is followed by a visual and microscopic inspection of the test objects. Phoenix Contact marking materials fulfill these high mechanical requirements.

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Vibration resistance

according to IEC 60068-2-6

This test demonstrates the vibration resistance and the tight fit of the marking materials under the influence of continuous vibrations. Harmonic, sinusoidal vibrations are applied to the test object to simulate rotating, pulsating or oscillating forces.

The test is performed on each of the three spatial axes (x, y, z). In the test, the objects run through a frequency range of 3 Hz to 150 Hz at a speed of one octave per minute. The r.m.s. value of the acceleration is up to 50 m/s2.

The test objects are tested on the three axes for two hours each. The marking materials must not be damaged in such a way that would impair their further use. All Phoenix Contact marking materials meet the requirements of the standard and are particularly suitable for applications in which they are subjected to high levels of vibration.

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Vibration test

Vibration test according to DIN 61373 – broadband noise  

Broadband noise

according to DIN EN 61373 – broadband noise (intensity according to DIN EN 50155)

In many applications and especially in transportation technology, marking materials are subjected to vibrations and shocks. For a practical simulation of vibration stress, the test objects are tested for vibration resistance at increasing and decreasing frequencies and amplitudes.

In the test, the objects run through a frequency range of 5 Hz to 150 Hz. The r.m.s. value of the acceleration is up to 42.5 m/s2. The test objects are tested for five hours in each of the three axes (x, y, z). The components and marking materials must not be damaged in such a way that would impair their continued use. All Phoenix Contact marking materials fulfill these stringent vibration requirements.

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Grid test

Grid test according to DIN EN ISO 2409  

Grid test

according to DIN EN ISO 2409

A Sellotape test is carried out for this. A transparent strip of self-adhesive tape with an adhesive strength of 10 ± 1 N is attached to the imprint or marking to be tested. It is then pulled away from the surface at an angle of 60° to the direction of tensile force at a speed of 1 cm/s.

There should be no marks from the print on the adhesive tape after the test. Phoenix Contact marking materials meet the requirements of this standard. They are tough and resistant to peeling.

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Adhesive strength test

Adhesive strength test according to FINAT test method No. 2  

Adhesive strength test

according to FINAT test method No. 2

The purpose of this test is to compare the adhesive strength of labels on various basic materials. To this end, a strip of labels (25 mm x 175 mm) is applied to the respective base material with a specified force.

After a defined storage period, the strip is removed from the base material at an angle of 90° and a speed of 300 mm/min. The adhesive strength is specified in N/25 mm. The test therefore enables the most suitable label to be selected for the application.

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PHOENIX CONTACT Ltd

21 Bell Road South
Lower Hutt, Wellington

Phone (+64) 4 912 2892
Fax (+64) 4 566 9219
Toll Free (Local)
0508 474 636

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